Medical Marijuana Patients In Hawaii Now Have A New Support Network

The use of cannabis for strictly medical reasons is legal in the State of Hawaii since 2005, but good luck to patients out here who want it. As far as law enforcement is concerned, drugs are drugs.

Brian Murphy, the director of Patients Without Time, a Maui-based medical marijuana co-op, found this out the hard way. In November 2008, the Maui Police Department launched Operation Weedkiller, which led to the arrest of Murphy on charges of selling marijuana and the confiscation of his group’s plants.

Now there’s a new FREE and CONFIDENTIAL support network with branches across the state for those who need medical cannabis. It’s called the Medical Cannabis Coalition of Hawaii (MCCHI), and the ACLU’s Hawaii office absolutely loves it, as they stated in a Jan. 3 blog post:

“The Coalition will strengthen the voices of the thousands in Hawaii who are impacted by the medical marijuana law and support the needs of this growing community. We encourage people to join to show support, learn more, and stay informed about medical cannabis best practices in Hawaii.”

According to the MCCHI website, the network will offer a variety of services to patients across the state:

  • Stay informed about the latest developments in Hawaii’s medical cannabis program,  including proposed changes or threats to existing law.
  • Learn how you can help expand the medical cannabis program, and fight back dangerous restrictions.
  • Share best practices with other patients, caregivers and doctors.
  • Access information on the latest medical cannabis laws and research in Hawai‘i and from around the world.
  • Receive a yearly reminder via email, phone, or mail–whatever works best for you–when your medical cannabis registration is due to be renewed.
  • Have the opportunity to amplify YOUR voice to ensure that the medical cannabis program effectively serves the people of Hawai‘i.

There will also be organizational meetings on Oahu, Maui, Hawaii Island and Kauai. For more information, check out mcchi.org or email info@mcchi.org. And remember, it’s free and confidential.

Photo: Wikimedia Commons